Temple Bugga Ramalingeswara Swamy Tadipatri History Booking

Know more details about the Temple Bugga Ramalingeswara Swamy Tadipatri History Booking, Location Of Temple Bugga Ramalingeswara Swamy.

Bugga Ramalingeswara Swamy temple is a Siva shrine located on the southern bank of the Penna river in Tadipatri, Anantapur district, Andhra Pradesh, India. Pemmasani Ramalinga Nayudu I, a Pemmasani Nayaka chieftain of the Gutti-Gandikota region during the reign of the Vijayanagara Empire, constructed it between 1490 and 1509.

The presiding deity is a linga, which is regarded as’swayambhu’ (naturally occurring or self-originated).

In front of the Vishnu shrine, there are seven small independent pillars that, when struck, produce the sound’saptaswara’ (the seven musical notes).

The temple’s gopurams are unfinished and were described as “wonders” by architectural historian James Anderson.

Temple Bugga Ramalingeswara Swamy Tadipatri History Booking

  • Time: 24 hours
  • Time Needed: 1 Day
  • There is no entry fee.

The best time to visit Tadipatri is when it is winter season, specifically from November to February. During these months, the temperature stays below 25 degrees, making exploring the town a pleasant experience. Moreover, the warmth during the summer period can be oppressive, with temperatures in the area reaching as high as 35 degrees.

Temple Bugga Ramalingeswara Swamy Tadipatri History

Tadipatri temples contain ancient temples with relics dating back centuries. This retreat on the western side of Andhra Pradesh was built during the golden years of the Vijaynagar Empire and is guaranteed to enchant any visitor.

Tadipatri should be your vacation destination if you are fascinated by history or interested in architecture. You can get a glimpse of sculptures and artworks dating all the way back to the Vijaynagar Empire here. The temples here are bound to draw a large number of pilgrims, but even non-believers can have a memorable experience by visiting them.

Bugga Ramalingeswara Swamy Temple History Tadipatri

After the history, a Ramalinga nayudu of the Vijayanagara Dynasty built this temple. Ramalinga owns cows and feeds them. One of those cows began dumping all of its milk into an ant colony.
The cowherd had attacked the ant hill with an axe. The night Ramalinga had a dream in which the Lord told him that the cowherd had harmed him, he requested that a temple be built at that location. As a result, he constructed this temple.
Lord Shiva, also known as Swayambhu, is the main deity (naturally occurring or self-originated). Shrine is seven small independent pillars in the temple in front of Vishnu; if we strike them, they produce saptaswara (the seven musical notes).

Bugga Ramalingeswara Swamy Temple Overview

Pemmasani Ramalinga Nayudu I, a Pemmasani Nayaka chieftain of the Gutti-Gandikota region during the reign of the Vijayanagara Empire, built the Bugga Ramalingeswara Swamy temple on the bank of the Penna river in the Tadipatri between 1490 and 1509.

The presiding deity is a linga, which is thought to be Swayambhu. In front of the Vishnu shrine in the temple, there are seven small independent pillars that, when struck, produce saptaswara. The temple’s unfinished gopurams have been described as “wonders” by architectonic historian James Anderson. During the reign of the Vijayanagara Empire, it was most likely constructed between 1490 and 1509. The temple was constructed by Ramalinga Nayudu, a chieftain of the Gutti-Gandikota region of the Vijayanagara Empire, according to the Tadipatri Kaifiyat compiled by Colin Mackenzie in 1802. As per legend, the temple was built on the site where the sage Parasurama lived and meditated.

In an axial line, the temple has a sanctum, ardha mandapa, and Mukha mandapa. The temple contains bas-relief structures depicting Ramayana and Mahabharata episodes. The presiding deity is a naturally occurring or self-originated swayambhu. The Shiva linga is facing west in this temple, as opposed to other Hindu temples where the deities are facing east. The Vishnu shrine’s seven pillars produce saptaswara when they are struck. The gopurams of this temple were described as “wonders” by architectural historian James Anderson.

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